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ANOTHER Squaw Dress

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squaw dress, huaraches, concho belt – and youth

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The 1950s!

Squaw dress, huaraches, concho belt – youth (youth is fleeting, you know) . . .

Huaraches, traditional handmade Mexican sandals with woven leather tops, have been around for hundreds of years and were popular among Mexican villagers and peasants.

Concho belts are a uniquely Southwestern art form, dating back to the Bosque Redondo period of Navajo history. With their simple tools and forges, Navajo and Zuni silverworkers were able to create bold and intricate pieces that were always among their owners’ most prized possessions. Though modern pieces are often shoddy and garish, the best antique belts have an understated yet distinctive look unlike anything else.

squaw dresses . . . and sandals . . . and youth

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squaw dresses and adorable sisters and moccasins

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my beautiful younger sister - wearing one of her squaw dresses

squaw dress and Nash Ramblers and parsonages

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Wearing one of the squaw dresses my Mother designed and stitched – sitting atop my Dad’s green Nash Rambler – at the side of the house we lived in (formerly a parsonage)  during the 1950s in Farmington, New Mexico.

“The Squaw Dress, a categorization label for several types of one- and two-piece dresses, was a regional style in the American Southwest in the late 1940s and became a national dress trend in the 1950s. Its defining feature, a full, tiered skirt, came in three shapes: (1) a slightly gathered skirt based on Navajo dress; (2) a “broomstick” or pleated skirt based on Navajo and Mexican attire; and (3) a fully gathered, three-tiered skirt based on contemporary Western Apache Camp Dresses or Navajo attire. In addition to the common designation of Squaw Dress, dresses with the third skirt type were also called Fiesta, Kachina, Tohono, or Patio Dress (depending on the type of decoration); the former two styles were called Navajo Dresses. Squaw Dresses were extremely popular because of their comfort and regional indigenous associations. They represented both idealized femininity and Americanness because of their Native American origins.”

Excerpted from:

What’s in a name? The 1940s-1950s “Squaw Dress”
By Parezo, Nancy J.
Publication: The American Indian Quarterly

Memories!