Category Archives: 1950s

Ah – remembering the 1950s

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the truckin’ days

B. F. Walker, Inc.

I can’t remember the year that Hubby began working for B. F. Walker, Inc.  He was working for Halliburton Oil Company when we first met (in Farmington, New Mexico during the BIG oil and gas boom in the Four Corners area in the 1950s).  Shortly after he came back from his stint in the Army he began employment with B. F. Walker (a subsidiary of  Noble Corporation).

In 1983 when we were living in Denver,  Hubby and a friend purchased B. F. Walker and those trucks provided our bucks until DH retired and we moved from Denver to Seguin, Texas.

My!  The turns life takes . . . or the choices we make I guess I should say – it was been a marvelous journey!   We have dear friends from all of the places we have lived or visited and I’m especially counting my blessings during this Holy Season.

B. F. Walker was incorporated in 1939 in Arkansas.  The company initially had horse-driven wagons, I understand.

Trivia:  a trucking company purchased a poem my mother wrote about a truckdriver and printed it on business cards to give to all of their truckdrivers.  How I would like to have one of those cards now.  When my mom and my dad were dating (in the 1930s), he was driving a truck loaded with potatoes from the northeastern part of New Mexico to the southern part of New Mexico (I imagine on a daily basis).  He was quite likely the flirty truckdriver she penned.

Although she never told me, I imagine they were in his truck when they eloped to Tucumcari, New Mexico in 1937! Perhaps on a potato run??

ANOTHER Squaw Dress

the guys – and two sneaky girls

theguys-b

Happy times . . . sadly, only two of these classmates are still living.  We have the memories . . .

Two sneaky gals interrupted the perfect lineup!

two gals snuck in!

squaw dress, huaraches, concho belt – and youth

squaw-dress_huaraches

The 1950s!

Squaw dress, huaraches, concho belt – youth (youth is fleeting, you know) . . .

Huaraches, traditional handmade Mexican sandals with woven leather tops, have been around for hundreds of years and were popular among Mexican villagers and peasants.

Concho belts are a uniquely Southwestern art form, dating back to the Bosque Redondo period of Navajo history. With their simple tools and forges, Navajo and Zuni silverworkers were able to create bold and intricate pieces that were always among their owners’ most prized possessions. Though modern pieces are often shoddy and garish, the best antique belts have an understated yet distinctive look unlike anything else.

squaw dresses . . . and sandals . . . and youth

squadress_sandals_blog

squaw dresses and adorable sisters and moccasins

mbsquawdress_blog

my beautiful younger sister - wearing one of her squaw dresses

squaw dress and Nash Ramblers and parsonages

squawdress_nashrambler

Wearing one of the squaw dresses my Mother designed and stitched – sitting atop my Dad’s green Nash Rambler – at the side of the house we lived in (formerly a parsonage)  during the 1950s in Farmington, New Mexico.

“The Squaw Dress, a categorization label for several types of one- and two-piece dresses, was a regional style in the American Southwest in the late 1940s and became a national dress trend in the 1950s. Its defining feature, a full, tiered skirt, came in three shapes: (1) a slightly gathered skirt based on Navajo dress; (2) a “broomstick” or pleated skirt based on Navajo and Mexican attire; and (3) a fully gathered, three-tiered skirt based on contemporary Western Apache Camp Dresses or Navajo attire. In addition to the common designation of Squaw Dress, dresses with the third skirt type were also called Fiesta, Kachina, Tohono, or Patio Dress (depending on the type of decoration); the former two styles were called Navajo Dresses. Squaw Dresses were extremely popular because of their comfort and regional indigenous associations. They represented both idealized femininity and Americanness because of their Native American origins.”

Excerpted from:

What’s in a name? The 1940s-1950s “Squaw Dress”
By Parezo, Nancy J.
Publication: The American Indian Quarterly

Memories!

Senior Day at Fort Lewis College, Durango, Colorado – 1956

we were so young

we were so young

1956 – Basketball Champs!

FHS Basketball Team - Champs!

FHS Basketball Team - Champs!