relax . . .

I Peter 2:2 – Like newborn infants, long for the pure spiritual milk . . .

relax_blog

“Our bodies are designed to deal with stress, and that’s all they’re designed for.”

“Stress is the stuff of life.”

_________

Fitcorp Health News

And while experts say that some stress is good for you — it can sharpen your senses and your mind — too much stress is bad for your mental and physical health. At the same time, relaxation can do wonders to restore balance in your life — and may even reduce some of the health risks associated with stress.

1. Meditate

If you’re thinking meditation means twisting your body into an uncomfortable position and uttering “oohs” and “omms” for an hour, guess again. Any repetitive action can be a source of meditation, says Herbert Benson, MD, author of The Relaxation Response and director emeritus, Benson-Henry Institute for Mind Body Medicine in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts. This includes walking, swimming, painting, knitting — any activity that helps keep your attention calmly in the present moment.

2. Picture Yourself Relaxed

Is your mind too talkative to meditate? Try creating a peaceful visualization, or “dreamscape.” To start, simply visualize anything that keeps your thoughts away from current tensions. It could be a favorite vacation spot, a fantasy island, that penthouse in New York City — or something “touchable,” like the feel of your favorite silk robe or cozy sweater.

3. Breathe Deeply

Feeling stressed evokes tense, shallow breathing, while calm is associated with relaxed breathing, says Michael Lee, author of Turn Stress into Bliss and founder of Phoenix Rising Yoga Therapy in Bristol, Vermont. So to turn tension into relaxation, he says, change the way you breathe.

4. Look Around You

“Mindfulness is the here-and-now approach to living that makes daily life richer and more meaningful,” says Claire Michaels Wheeler, MD, PhD, author of 10 Simple Solutions to Stress. It’s approaching life like a child, without passing judgment on what occurs. Mindfulness means focusing on one activity at a time, so forget multi-tasking! Staying in the present-tense can help promote relaxation and provide a buffer against anxiety and depression.

5. Drink Hot Tea

If you’re a coffee-guzzler, consider going green. Coffee raises levels of the notorious stress hormone, cortisol, while green tea offers health and beauty, says Nicholas Perricone, MD, author of 7 Secrets to Beauty, Health, and Longevity.

6. Show Some Love

Induce the relaxation response by cuddling your pet, giving an unexpected hug to a friend or family member, snuggling with your spouse, or talking to a friend about the good things in your lives, says psychologist Deborah Rozman, PhD, co-author of Transforming Stress. When you do, you’ll be reducing your stress levels.

7. Try Self-Massage

When your muscles are tense and you’ve no time to visit a pro, try this simple self-massage technique from Darrin Zeer, author of Lover’s Massage and Office Yoga. Relax, and travel straight to Zen-land.

* Place both hands on your shoulders and neck.
* Squeeze with your fingers and palms.
* Rub vigorously, keeping shoulders relaxed.
* Wrap one hand around the other forearm.
* Squeeze the muscles with thumb and fingers.
* Move up and down from your elbow to fingertips and back again.
* Repeat with other arm.

8. Take a Time-Out

Adults need time-outs, too. So when you sense your temper is about to erupt, Jeff Brantley, MD, author of Five Good Minutes In the Evening, suggests finding a quiet place to sit or lie down and put the stressful situation on hold. Take a few deep breaths and concentrate on releasing tension and calming your heartbeat. Quiet your mind and remember: Time is always on your side, so relax. The stress can wait.
continued…

9. Try a Musical Detour

Music can calm the heartbeat and soothe the soul, the experts say. So, when the going gets rough, take a musical stress detour by aligning your heartbeat with the slow tempo of a relaxing song. And you might want to make that a classical tune. Research shows that listening to 30 minutes of classical music may produce calming effects equivalent to taking 10 mg of Valium.

10. Take an Attitude Break

Thirty seconds is enough time to shift your heart’s rhythm from stressed to relaxed, Rozman says. The way to do that: Engage your heart and your mind in positive thinking. Start by envisioning anything that triggers a positive feeling — a vision of your child or spouse, the image of your pet, that great piece of jewelry you’re saving up to buy, a memento from a vacation — whatever it is, conjuring up the thought will help slow breathing, relax tense muscles and put a smile on your face. Rozman says that creating a positive emotional attitude can also calm and steady your heart rhythm, contributing to feelings of relaxation and peace.

By Jenny Stamos Kovacs

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About hopeseguin

Who am I? I'm still discovering just who I am, I suppose. A. Powell Davis writes that "Life is just a chance to grow a soul."

Posted on August 29, 2009, in Quote of the Day, This and That and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

  1. WOW,this is really very helpful and so are your other blogs! šŸ™‚

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