Still Alice

stillalice

She pictured her own name on a matching headstone next to Anne’s.  She’d rather die than lose her mind.  She looked up at John, his eyes patient, waiting for an answer.  How could she tell him she had Alzheimer’s disease?  He loved her mind.  How could he love her with this?  She looked back at Anne’s name carved in stone.

Still Alice by Lisa Genova

How Lisa Genova used the social media . . .

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About hopeseguin

Who am I? I'm still discovering just who I am, I suppose. A. Powell Davis writes that "Life is just a chance to grow a soul."

Posted on May 25, 2009, in Alzheimer's and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. Lisa Genova writes:

    My grandmother had Alzheimer’s when she was 85, and I watched this disease systematically disassemble her. As her granddaughter, I was heartbroken. But as a neuroscientist, I was fascinated. I read a lot in the scientific literature about what was going on inside her head at the molecular level. I read a lot of nonfiction written by clinicians and caregivers. But I couldn’t find a satisfying answer to the question, “What does it feel like to have this?” By the time my family was caring for my grandmother, she was too far along to communicate an answer to this question. But someone in the earliest stages could. This was the seed for Still Alice.

  2. Still Alice has been recommended as a possible choice for the Book Nuts Book Club (which meets at the Seguin library on the 4th Monday of each month).

    Mark Warner in the Alzheimer’s Daily News writes that Still Alice is “a masterpiece that will touch lives in ways none of us can even imagine. This book is the best portrayal of the Alzheimer’s journey that I have read.”

    Phil Bolsta, author of Sixty Seconds writes: “This book is as important as it is impressive, and will grace the lives of those affected by this dread disease for generations to come.”

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